The magnitude of it all

In 2014 Randall Munroe estimated that Google stores 10 exabytes of data across all of its operations. See list of SI prefixes. If CPUs are topping out at gigahertz then single operations aren't going to subceed the order of nanoseconds.

1 000 kilo | milli .001
1 000 000 mega | micro .000 001
1 000 000 000 giga | nano .000 000 001
1 000 000 000 000 tera | pico .000 000 000 001
1 000 000 000 000 000 peta | femto .000 000 000 000 001
1 000 000 000 000 000 000 exa | atto .000 000 000 000 000 001
1 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 zetta | zepto .000 000 000 000 000 000 001

You might find it easier to think of them in multiples of 1000. And you may be tempted to use binary prefixes to be precise (kibi, mebi, gibi) but most people won't know what you're talking about. Also, everybody uses 1000^3 rather than 2^20 because it makes your performance look better.

1000^ 1000^
kilo 1 milli -1
mega 2 micro -2
giga 3 nano -3
tera 4 pico -4
peta 5 femto -5
exa 6 atto -6
zetta 7 zepto -7

Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years

https://norvig.com/21-days.html

actions duration
execute typical instruction 1/1,000,000,000 sec = 1 nanosec
fetch from L1 cache memory 0.5 nanosec
branch misprediction 5 nanosec
fetch from L2 cache memory 7 nanosec
Mutex lock/unlock 25 nanosec
fetch from main memory 100 nanosec
send 2K bytes over 1Gbps network 20,000 nanosec
read 1MB sequentially from memory 250,000 nanosec
fetch from new disk location (seek) 8,000,000 nanosec
read 1MB sequentially from disk 20,000,000 nanosec
send packet US to Europe and back 150 milliseconds = 150,000,000 nanosec

References

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